Being a diverse and forward-thinking movement also means consistently seeking to understand and experiment with new ideas. The GBV Prevention Network, therefore, offers access to a wealth of compelling resources from both members and non-members. Here, you can keep up-to-date with thousands of the latest ideas and efforts being made to prevent VAW around the region. You can also share your own vision and practices, so others can learn from your experiences. We hope these materials will continue to expand our Network’s culture of learning!

Theme Feminism

Get Moving! Transforming Individuals and Organisations

Learning Paper: The increase in public dialogue, programming and investment around violence against women (VAW) is a promising development. At Raising Voices, we have seen a dramatic shift in the diversity and number of groups working to prevent and respond to VAW—an effort that was previously concentrated within women’s organizations. While this increased focus represents an exciting milestone—reflecting the hard work of many decades of feminist activism—it also comes with some challenges.

The GBV Prevention Network set out to engage with members working on VAW (prevention, advocacy and response) to develop a shared understanding of core VAW concepts and connect to a more politicized perspective.

To do this, we developed Get Moving! a methodology designed to take organizations through a process of intensive reflection of feminist principles, at both a personal and organizational level. Since 2010, thirty two civil society organisations across thirteen countries have participated in Get Moving!. After six years, with plans for expansion to additional GBV Prevention Network members, this learning paper provides a critical reflection of the Get Moving! experience thus far.

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Authors: Jean Kemitare, Sophie Namy, Sara Siebert and Lori Michau

Published: 2017

Source: GBV Prevention Network

Activists ICT Toolkit for Feminist Movement Building

Across the world, women are using information and communication technologies (ICTs) to support rights agendas, tell their own stories and challenge emerging issues in regard to access, women’s voices and violence. African women are writing about sexuality, women members of parliament use social media to promote their political agendas, rural women access market prices via mobile phones, students find journals online and save themselves money.

Most of our activism and organising happens and always will happen in person and “offline”. Linking to the tools of the online world, can create powerful ways to make visible our campaigns in new and wider spaces and to engage expanded networks of people.

Read the resource here

Source: Just Associates

Year of publication: 2015

Source: Stanford social innovation review

Investing with a gender lens can create financial and social impact by increasing women’s access to capital, promoting workplace equity, and creating products and services that improve the lives of women and girls. Across a wide spectrum of society there is growing recognition of the central role that women play in the world economy. Books such as President Jimmy Carter’s Call to Action and Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In advocate increased women’s empowerment. Former US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton made a strong case for the economic inclusion of women as a vital source of economic growth when she spoke at the first Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation High-Level Policy Dialogue on Women and the Economy.1 And studies by corporations such as Goldman Sachs highlight the potential increases in GDP if women had equal access to employment and credit.

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The Collective Impact of the Dutch MDG3 Fund, Srilatha Batliwala, 2013

The second report in a new research series on resources for women’s rights organizing from the Association for Women’s Rights in Development, this piece analyzes the aggregate impact of women’s organizations around the world that received grants from the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs’ MDG3 Fund. Including results from 78% of the grantees, this analysis demonstrates the huge reach and transformation that is possible when organizations working to build women’s collective power for change receive serious resources for an extended period of time, with flexibility to refine their strategies to adapt to shifting contexts.

Source: http://www.awid.org/Library

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